THE PLACEMENT OF ANCIENT TRADITION IN NEW CITIES

I am in love with the Middle East. My trip to Qatar was for work in December 2016- camera operating with a good friend of mine, Mostafa, for a few weeks. Dubai was added in whilst I was there so Mostafa and I could check out the Dubai Film Fest. As I was there for work, I took most of my photos on the fly with my iPhone and editing with the Snapseed app. Rather than an extremely artistic approach, this trip was all about documenting my experiences. A place so radically different than home with such a culture behind it - allowed me to capture beautiful moments.

I made sure to do the touristy things in my guide book in Dubai and stick with the locals in Qatar. Qatar is the richest country in the world and it shows. Beautiful buildings erected in what seems like months, not years. A generation ago and half the city wasn't even built yet- and it's still under construction to be bigger and brighter than ever. 

My photos from Qatar document early mornings before I was working. The Katara cultural village was empty in the mornings. I would get on the earliest shuttle bus from my residence around 2 hours before work so I could explore. The sun would already be up, the beachfront with a cool wind coming off of it and the entire place completely empty. I could walk from the beach to the most inner part of the village and not see anyone. It was an incredible feeling. These photos represent a focus on stillness and the recently built architecture made to feel old.

In contrast, all of my Dubai photos have a busy composition. The wharf by the Spice Souk with textiles piled high on the street. The abras streaming across the water to get passengers to the other side. The movement in the markets with traditional food being made. 

One of the more interesting approaches I have had to photography thus far- iPhone only, minimal post processing and a more voyeuristic approach without compromising composition.